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Hello folks - I have probably one of the older P cars on this forum - 2000 Boxster (base) ---- I'm trying to narrow in on the parts# I'd need to order based on some research I've done (ultimately w/ this link below)
[986forum.com]

This noise issue (clunking noise over small bumps at low speed - whether coasting or in gear) I've had for several years now (getting worse over time) w/ this car and my local "indie" shop was not able to actually find the cause of the noise a couple yrs ago when I took it in just for that (I wasn't happy about that, but then again, happy that they didn't try to push something they weren't sure would fix it). But after doing more research now.....I'm pretty convinced what is in the video is same situation I have and I'm now ready to move on w/ the fix, and see if it helps.

1) can you identify what the part# is for the part highlighted in red in step#5 of the above URL? This is what that person is calling a "rear upper control arm (track arm)". I would probably go w/ OEM but open to a non-OEM part if others have had good luck w/ it.

2) would that same part possibly also be called a "rear track rod"? (just curious)

Thanks in advance
... that can make the noise you describe.
The most common are the droplinks.
If you can make them move with your fingers when the car has the suspension loaded then they're done.
The upper control arm can also make similar noise. Again, if you can move it with your hand with the suspension loaded it's time to change it.
I do not like the adjustable type. These should be fixed length, not adjustable.
Some of the other ball joints may get also noisy but they tend to creak more than rattle.
Happy Boxstering
Pedro

Pedro Bonilla 1998 Boxster 986 - 298,000+ miles: http://www.PedrosGarage.com
PCA National Club Racing Scrutineer - PCA National HPDE Instructor - PCA Technical Committee (Boxster/Cayman)

Racecar spelled backwards is Racecar
"Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting" ... Steve McQueen as Michael Delaney in "LeMans"
"If you wait, all that happens is that you get older"... Mario Andretti
"Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose" ... Ayrton Senna
The basic job is to find something that moves - maybe under load. Drop links, as pedro noted, can wear and make clunking noises. The track arm *could*, but a few cautions:

1. if that is loose, your toe and therefore tracking stability would vary. That link locates the control arm, and therefore wheel, front-to-rear. The toe link controls actual toe, but that link keeps the control arm, which is more or less perpendicular to the line of travel, from moving. I'd be surprised if that was not noticeable.

2. you may need a lot of force to know if its moved

3. my concern with the adjustable ones is different than pedro's. They appear to have solid metal-metal pivot points. These wear, transmit noise, and are open to the elements. Yes, the allow you to dial in some parameters, bu they wont last and its more liekly they allow you to dial them OUT (get it wrong).

4. If you do decide they are worn, Lemfordrer and TRW are OEMs to both Porsche and Audi at various times and are similar quality, sans the logo.

Good luck.

Grant gee-lenahan-at-vee-eff-email-dot-net


Pedro Bonilla 1998 Boxster 986 - 298,000+ miles: http://www.PedrosGarage.com
PCA National Club Racing Scrutineer - PCA National HPDE Instructor - PCA Technical Committee (Boxster/Cayman)

Racecar spelled backwards is Racecar
"Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting" ... Steve McQueen as Michael Delaney in "LeMans"
"If you wait, all that happens is that you get older"... Mario Andretti
"Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose" ... Ayrton Senna
"I do not like the adjustable type. These should be fixed length, not adjustable."

Where the focus is on fixed length. If set properly (a big if) they can be adjustable. But i also saw the solid joints which can wear more.

And directly to your point, anything you can adjust, you can get wrong. That adjusts caster? I believe...


G

Grant gee-lenahan-at-vee-eff-email-dot-net
That particular piece does not need to be adjusted whatsoever.
The geometry of the rear suspension is very complicated already.
Why would anyone complicate it even further?
If you start messing with the caster you're adding another degree of difficulty in alignment.
The reason they offer the adjustable parts is so that it will fit othe models or brands, not because the adjustability is a bonus.
But I've seen these parts become loose and then you're in real trouble especially if you are tracking the car.
I really don't like them.
Happy Boxstering
Pedro

Pedro Bonilla 1998 Boxster 986 - 298,000+ miles: http://www.PedrosGarage.com
PCA National Club Racing Scrutineer - PCA National HPDE Instructor - PCA Technical Committee (Boxster/Cayman)

Racecar spelled backwards is Racecar
"Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting" ... Steve McQueen as Michael Delaney in "LeMans"
"If you wait, all that happens is that you get older"... Mario Andretti
"Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose" ... Ayrton Senna


Grant gee-lenahan-at-vee-eff-email-dot-net
Thanks for the info here guys. Just so it's clear, my mechanic looked underneath my car and inspected all the components as much as he could, and they didn't find anything obviously wrong or loose.

Someone shared this w/ me just now (item#8 is of particular interest to me) ---


Can you tell me what the actual part# would be for item#8? So I can relay this to my mechanic.

Does someone have a better diagram for the rear suspension components that shows the part#'s (and part names) along w/ a diagram? That would really help.
#8 is the control arm.

See here:

[www.autoatlanta.com]

Just a heads up: The parts diagram is for MY's '97 to '04 but in the parts # list the control arm part # only starts with MY 2001.

For your 2000 Boxster base model you may have to visit a Porsche parts department and have the parts manager look up the actual part # based on your car's VIN.
track arm URL
grant - 3 years ago
[www.pelicanparts.com]

TRW is excellent

Grant gee-lenahan-at-vee-eff-email-dot-net
Number 8 in the diagram, the trailing arms, may rattle when going over bumps. If you don't get the rattle when braking or accelerating, but only when coasting or under light loads there's a good chance it may be the trailing arms. The problem is with the ball joint at the chassis end, held by bolt 16. On mine there was no observable play and the boots were intact. But when I replaced the trailing arms, not a terribly difficult job, the rattle disappeared completely.
Helpful post Ankur. I'll let folks know here how it goes once I get around to getting this done.
just a thought and i may be way out in left field but could the motor mount be the culprit? with a 17 year old boxster, that rubber chunk could just about be gone. it would make the clunk under load or not.
if i remember correctly from my MY2000 S, it's very hard (or even impossible?) to see with the car up on a lift so may have been missed by your mechanic.

how about the muffler mounts? those could clunk as well if they're toast, no?

MY 2000 S, Ocean Blue, Metropol Blue, Savanah Beige. Bought June 2000 - Sold May 2010
Folks if I may, have an update. And I'm going to combine this info for this post as well as related post [pedrosboard.com] --- all here.

Today I jacked the rear (one side at a time) of the car up to get the back tire off the ground. Then I just grab onto the wheel w/ both hands. First tried to move the wheel from side to side. No movement, no noises.

Next I tried to move the wheel up and down. I didn't hear anything odd on the up movement........but on the DOWN movement, I heard the clunk! Same sound as what I'm used to hearing when driving I think. Furthermore, w/ my ear on the back fender of the car, I could tell the noise was coming from the top of the strut/shock. Behavior was the same w/ either of the 2 rear wheels when up in the air. I assume this is not a normal sound, right?

I took a couple pictures (this is rear left shock)
[s1310.photobucket.com]
[s1310.photobucket.com]

I don't know what that orangish looking thing is on mine - something worn. And don't know if that's somehow causing the noise but I don't think it could be.... since the sound is right from the top of the shock (near fender).

Next I'm going to remove the engine compartment cover and try to look at the top of the strut mount to see if I can find anything loose up there (will advise if I find something that might help).

All this is making me think I need to replace the rear shock/strut (moreso than rear upper control arms). Any feedback appreciated.
The rear strut mounts are probably worn.
The act similarly as the front engine mount with the same type of rubber damping.
Happy Boxstering
Pedro

Pedro Bonilla 1998 Boxster 986 - 298,000+ miles: http://www.PedrosGarage.com
PCA National Club Racing Scrutineer - PCA National HPDE Instructor - PCA Technical Committee (Boxster/Cayman)

Racecar spelled backwards is Racecar
"Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting" ... Steve McQueen as Michael Delaney in "LeMans"
"If you wait, all that happens is that you get older"... Mario Andretti
"Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose" ... Ayrton Senna
Almost certainly your strut mount (part #2, below) is worn. It's a common wear item. While you're in there I recommend you also replace the bellows (part #7) and the bump stop (part #8) because they're cheap and not worth replacing unless you're already taking apart the strut assembly.


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