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Beautiful to see it being done, though.


Expect the best, and accept no substitute.

Products for your Boxster, Cayman and Carrera.
On the Atlanta trip, I noticed my friend kept a Fiji water bottle in the drink holder. He explained it makes for a good fit as it's not huge, and the square sides conform nicely to the holder's clamp. When I've used other brands, and specifically with Earth Water, I would never completely fill the bottle, as I didn't like the idea of all that weight being supported by a somewhat delicate holder. Also, the EW bottle is thin-walled; easily crushing when handled, whereas the Fiji is firm. Lastly, the Fiji inherently has a lower center of mass in relation to the clamp, so it's more stable, and less likely to flip out.




Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/29/2018 08:03AM by Laz.
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Minus 40 degrees... Is that Fahrenheit or Celsius?
What’s a cup holder?
Happy Boxstering,
Pedro

Pedro Bonilla 1998 Boxster 986 - 287,000+ miles: http://www.PedrosGarage.com
PCA National Club Racing Scrutineer - PCA National HPDE Instructor - PCA Technical Committee (Boxster/Cayman)

Racecar spelled backwards is Racecar
"Racing is life. Anything before or after is just waiting" ... Steve McQueen as Michael Delaney in "LeMans"
"If you wait, all that happens is that you get older"... Mario Andretti
"Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose" ... Ayrton Senna
It's part of the Grand Touring Package. winking smiley

Minus 40 degrees... Is that Fahrenheit or Celsius?

"Mmm... Iodine-131."



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/01/2018 12:07PM by Laz.
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While there's apparently political chaos in Fiji, and infrastructure issues, for whatever was in the "factory fill," I replenish the bottle several times with my home water before discarding. My source is: well > water softener > 4 filter under sink system > improved filter Brita. I checked to see if Fiji bottle manufacture uses Bisphenol A (BPA, ) and fortunately it doesn't, according to them. Also, it's a recycling type "1."
ps: I did see a Cleveland vs. Fiji Water article concerning arsenic. It seems there were conflicting results.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/03/2018 08:44AM by Laz. (view changes)

Minus 40 degrees... Is that Fahrenheit or Celsius?
thumbs up
Boxsterra - 2 months ago
I never understood why people buy bottled water when free, good quality water is everywhere. Happy to hear you're not buying Fiji by the case.
Discounting whatever positive nutritional, therapeutic, or culinary effect sea salt may have, I don't get using salt from present-day, industrial revolution contaminated bodies of water. Pass the plastic micro-particle, PCB shaker, please!

Give me millions of years old salt from a Miocene Epoch Austrian mine, even if it's loaded with sea life remains.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 10/03/2018 12:16PM by Laz. (view changes)
From an article that details the salt from sea water process used by a salt producer here in the SF Bay Area:

[www.thekitchn.com]

The process for harvesting sea salt on this commercial level is really a scaled-up version of how sea salt has been harvested for centuries. They create a series of interlocking shallow ponds that are exposed to the sun and wind. As the water evaporates and the salt concentrates, the water is moved along the chain of ponds closer to the actual harvesting facility.

The sea water starts off with a natural salinity of about 3% and ends up at about 25% salinity. At this point, the salt starts to crystallize and can be harvested. Get this: the whole process takes about five years!

Once it's ready for harvesting, a truck with a rake attachment breaks up the salt bed. A harvester comes along to scoop up the salt and transfers it to dump trucks, which then carry the salt to the washing facility. The salt is rinsed first in a brine solution to wash out calcium and other impurities, and then in actual Bay water to dissolve the magnesium chloride. What you're left with is 99.8% pure sodium chloride sea salt.


Minus 40 degrees... Is that Fahrenheit or Celsius?
A scene in Brittany from a fascinating PBS show, "Food - Delicious Science."
[www.pbs.org]
For bottled water my experience has been mostly with the bottled water that the local Porsche dealer stocks in a refrigerated cabinet in the sales area. I can't recall the brand: Crystal Geyser maybe?; but the bottle holds around 16 ounces and is small in diameter and its shape cylindrical so it fits cup holders well. I have one of these bottles in the fridge at home filled with water to put in the holder on my bicycle when I go for a ride in the evening.

For my cars I used to use the Porsche Thermal Mug filled with ice and water. It has a good cap that doesn't leak and it is very good at keeping fluids cold (or hot) for a long time. But I put it to work at home as my coffee "mug". It keeps the coffee so hot -- even with the lid off -- that I have to drop in an ice cube to cool the coffee down so I can drink it in time to leave the house for work.

Kind of pricey, but sometimes dealers offer these at a discount to clear out stock. The SA at the local dealer gave me one, left it in its box on the seat of the car one day when I picked up the car. Link below:

[www.delawareporscheparts.com]

Nowadays for drinking water I use a thermos mug that I bought at Walmart. This:

[www.walmart.com]

Like the Porsche thermal mug it too is very good at keeping water cold. I fill one up with ice cubes and water before I leave the house in the morning for work and when I get at the office I leave the mug in the car -- out of the sun -- and it still has ice and water in it at night when I leave for home. It is a little bit bigger than the Porsche coffee mug though and so I don't know if it would fit in your car's cup holders.
Better option, use a Swell bottle. Keeps water cold and you can keep it between the driver's seat and door. Plus, they are larger (holds more water), and are environmentally friendly. Where I live, the county is considering no longer recycling glass bottles. Too many. Loss leader and they end up in landfills due to over supply of glass bottles.
Thanks for the tip!
Laz - 2 months ago
If I get one, maybe I can fill it with this:



Minus 40 degrees... Is that Fahrenheit or Celsius?
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